Category Archives: Social Media

Displaying Selected YouTube Data API Thumbnails On A Web Page Via ASP.NET Web Forms

Previously, I blogged about “Displaying Selected YouTube Video Thumbnails On An ASP.NET Web Forms Page,” when you know the video IDs of the thumbnails you want to hyperlink.

A reader recently asked me how to hyperlink YouTube video thumbnails based on searching for a keyword. I promised to address that, so here goes.

Interestingly enough, searching the YouTube Data API is accomplished in a REST-like manner quite similar to the methodology I used for shortening URLs in ASP.NET via the bit.ly API.

  • Form a simple request URL to the YouTube Data API that contains the appropriate search parameters;
  • Use a WebRequest to send that URL to Google, which returns an XML document with results;
  • Use WebResponse to dump that stream into an XmlDocument;
  • Use XPath and XmlNode‘s SelectNodes method to recursively get the thumbnails from each entry; and
  • Bind up a pile of Hyperlink controls, which are added dynamically to a Panel control.

Sounds more complicated than it actually is. Let’s do it.
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Subscribe To Seth Godin’s Blog. Do It Now.

If you aren’t reading Seth Godin’s blog, you ought to be. Especially if you’re an entrepreneur, independent contractor, in sales or a client-facing role, or are otherwise responsible for leadership or the bottom line.

Seth Godin

Seth Godin

Since that describes pretty much every developer, probably you should be checking out Seth’s Blog.

He posts once a day, usually in the morning. Which is actually a trick he recently blogged about: Rather than looking at Twitter or Facebook or whatever first thing, and thus following, make a point of doing something — anything — productive, first thing, so that you’re leading. Then you can check out your social media channels.

I’m trying to learn that habit; it’s difficult, but it does make a huge difference in terms of productivity.

Detractors and naysayers consider Godin’s posts tripe and self-promotion. Sure, some of it can come off as a bit pandering, important or simplistic. Don’t confuse the words for the message. And it’s always good to be reminded of the basics.

I subscribe to Godin’s RSS feed via Google Reader. He notes blog posts on Twitter at @ThisIsSethsBlog and on his Facebook page.

However you get Godin’s thoughts, get them. You’ll be doing yourself a favor.

All links in this post on delicious: http://delicious.com/dougvdotcom/subscribe-to-seth-godins-blog-do-it-now

I read your article about auto-hashtagging. Maybe you forgot when a to-be-tag is ending with a ‘.’ of ‘,’ or other punctuation…?

Seems that’s the case. Good catch! An easy fix is to simply run the input string through a regular expression that strips out the punctuation before exploding it into an array.

Ask me anything

Review: Free: The Future of a Radical Price

Free: The Future of a Radical PriceFree: The Future of a Radical Price by Chris Anderson

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Reading Free: The Future of a Radical Price reminded me, in many ways, of  The Grand Design.

To understand the universe on the quantum level, you have to embrace understandings and facts that seem ludicrous at human scales. That is, that we have free will; that things cannot be in the same place at the same time; that time progresses at one speed and forward only, are all convenient and explicit truths for our day-to-day existence. But at the subatomic level, that’s not how things work; not at all.

Anderson’s arguments about Free — that is, gratis and libre — are presented in the same sense, if not quite as well or explicitly.

Free does a fine job of explaining the mechanics of how things can be free on the Web: namely, per-unit / per-user costs are so low, they might as well be considered nothing.

He also does a good job of explaining the obvious money-making models applied successfully so far: advertising, freemium (basic service is free; premium service costs money) and non-monetary / indirect recompense, such as an increase in reputation / marketing of ancillary products, such as concerts and merchandise for musicians or speaking engagements and consultations for professionals.

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